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Teleology

Either: a kind of explanation that makes reference to an end, goal, or purpose (“teleological explanation”); or, a kind of phenomenon characterized by apparent or actual goal-directedness (“teleological phenomena”).

References:

Lennox, J.G. (1992). “Teleology.” In E.F. Keller, & E.A. Lloyd (Eds.), Keywords in evolutionary biology (pp. 324–333). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Teleology (External, or Extrinsic)

A kind of quality or phenomenon characterized by actual or apparent goal-directedness in which the goal (real or apparent), and the agency by which the goal is achieved, are imparted to the system exhibiting the quality or phenomenon in question. Compare to “Teleology (Internal, or Intrinsic).”

References:

Lennox, J.G. (1992). “Teleology.” In E.F. Keller, & E.A. Lloyd (Eds.), Keywords in evolutionary biology (pp. 324–333). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Teleology (Internal, or Intrinsic)

A kind of quality or phenomenon characterized by actual or apparent goal-directedness in which the goal (real or apparent), and the agency by which the goal is achieved, inhere in the system exhibiting the quality or phenomenon in question. Compare to “Teleology (External, or Extrinsic).”

References:

Lennox, J.G. (1992). “Teleology.” In E.F. Keller, & E.A. Lloyd (Eds.), Keywords in evolutionary biology (pp. 324–333). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Teleonomy

The quality of apparent goal-directedness, particularly in living systems.

References:

Pittendrigh, C.S. (1958). “Adaptation, natural selection, and behavior.” In A. Roe, & G.G. Simpson (Eds.), Behavior and evolution (pp. 390–416). New Haven: Yale University Press.