Project News

May 19
Background selection theory overestimates effective population size for high mutation rates

Joanna Masel, PI of the “Universal principles of evolutionary adaptation” project, with co-author Joseph Matheson, recently published their preprint, “Background selection theory overestimates effective population size for high mutation rates,” online in bioRxiv. The authors “simulate genomes evolving under background selection, allowing the emergence of linkage disequilibria. With realistically high deleterious mutation rates, neutral diversity is much lower than predicted from previous analytical theory.”

ASSOCIATED PROJECTS
May 16
Why kinship is progeneratively constrained: Extending anthropology

Robert Wilson, a member of the “Transitions in individuality: from ecology to teleonomy” project, recently published “Why kinship is progeneratively constrained: Extending anthropology” in Synthese. The paper “draws on recent cognitive science, developmental cognitive psychology, and the philosophy of science to offer a novel argument for a view of kinship as progeneratively or reproductively constrained.”

ASSOCIATED PROJECTS
May 12
G protein–coupled receptor kinase 5 regulates thrombin signaling in platelets via PAR-1

Jonathan M. Gibbins, a member of the “Mistakes in living systems: a new conceptual framework” project, contributed to the article “G protein–coupled receptor kinase 5 regulates thrombin signaling in platelets via PAR-1” recently published in Blood Advances. The authors show that “thrombin-mediated activation of human platelets causes binding of GRK5 to PAR-1 and that deletion of the mouse homolog Grk5 enhances thrombin-induced platelet activation sensitivity and increases platelet accumulation at the site of vascular injury.”

ASSOCIATED PROJECTS
May 10
“Comprehensive matrix of science education with an intercultural approach” seminar on 24 May

The History, Philosophy and Biology Teaching Lab (LEFHBio), associated with the Institute of Biology/ Federal University of Bahia and the National Institute of Science and Technology in Interdisciplinary and Transdisciplinary Studies in Ecology and Evolution (INCT IN-TREE), Brazil, will continue its seminar cycle on May 24th 2022 with the talk by Dra. Adela Molina, Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas (Colombia), entitled “Comprehensive matrix of science education with an intercultural approach”.

The previous seminar in this series (by Kostas Kampourakis: Students’ “teleological misconceptions” in evolution education: why the underlying design stance, not teleology per se, is the problem) is available on the LEFHBio YouTube channel.

ASSOCIATED PROJECTS
May 9
Dynamic changes in begging signal short-term information on hunger and need

Renée Duckworth, a member of the project's Scientific Board of Advisors, recently co-authored “Dynamic Changes in Begging Signal Short-Term Information on Hunger and Need” in The American Naturalist. The authors write that their results “show the importance of assessing the timescale of signal change to understand its function.”

ASSOCIATED PROJECTS